Find the best buyer for your firm and employees

Hand holding businessman icon - HR concept

When selling your consulting firm you will reach the point where you go into exclusive negotiations with your preferred buyer. This is after maybe 30 to 60 have been approached, 10 to 20 have expressed interest and of those 3 or 5 want to do a deal. If price is everything to you, then any buyer will do and no doubt you’ve selected the highest bidder. However this is rarely the case, beyond price there are usually other important exit goals.

There are several factors you should consider before going to market to sell your firm and during the sifting process towards closing a deal with your ideal partner.

Life after the sale – is your objective to exit immediately, do your earn-out and leave, or extend your career? If the latter, then the new home must be a company you really want to be a part of, doing the kind of work that inspires you, and provides you with superior benefits to the freedom and entrepreneurial life you’ve experienced so far.

Brand continuation and independence – are you happy for your company to be subsumed, or is it important that your brand grows as a result of new investment and assets provided by your buyer? Different buyers, financial and strategic, will offer different models and achieving the latter objective is more likely with financial investors than trade buyers, the former is more likely with Big 4 type entities.

Staff protection – how important is their future to you? If the reason for the acquisition includes economies of scale, some will be retained and some will go, so who do you want to look after? Buyer selection is key to how their loyalty is repaid. If most of your consultants came out of the Big 4 or other multi-nationals, they may not want to go back. Whereas others may be keen to be a part of a new company with more interesting work, career path and foreign opportunities.

Cast the net wide – considering the above, it will help in categorizing and prioritizing buyer types that may fit. When you take your firm to market, consider all the categories of buyer that may want your firm for different reasons. The obvious candidates are not always the best. Casting the net wide finds the surprise outliers that may offer a compelling opportunity.

Culture compatibility – after you’ve been presented to potential buyers and interested parties are in play, look hard at their culture. You’re coming from an agile, flexible organization, however if the buyer is a bureaucratic monolith, how likely is it that you and your staff can handle the red tape? If not, then the merger is likely to fail, along with your earn-out and legacy.

Price versus deal structure – You may have some good offers from companies that fit your criteria above, but perhaps one is offering an outstanding price. However, the headline price is likely to only provide 50% cash up front; the rest will (hopefully) come in the earn-out over two or three years. If another offer represents slightly lower total price, but is otherwise a better home for the business, you might seriously consider taking what at first appear to be less generous terms. Here is your opportunity to trade headline price for a better deal structure and/or reduced earn-out risk. As well as the best home for your business, you also want the highest possible likelihood of securing the other 50% of the deal.

Make sure you consider all of these factors throughout the process, because you are more likely to achieve a successful sale that ticks all of your hard and soft exit objectives. You will be richer, happier and more fulfilled when you have looked after yourself, your staff and legacy.

If you want to discuss your exit objectives and need a sounding board, please contact us and we’d be happy to help.

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